Shown above, the 1st floor of the Skansie home was built in 1908 and the netshed followed in 1910.  After the City purchased the site in 2002, the garage (pictured above in 2004) was replaced with a public pavilion. The house is now home to the Gig Harbor Visitors Center and non-profit environmental organization, Harbor WildWatch.  

The brothers spent their lives in Gig Harbor.  They were well-respected for their fishing skills and mechanical know-how.  The Skansie NetShed Foundation honors the spirit of the brothers by maintaining the shed as it was.  It will be open seasonally and for special events.  Go to Hours of Operation for up-to-date information on the Netshed schedule.  (Photo courtesy of Guy Hoppen)

When Mayor Gretchen Wilbert worked with the heirs of the Skansie Homestead in 2002 to purchase the site, it signaled the community's commitment to preserving local maritime culture.  Today, Skansie Park hosts festivals, events, and activities throughout the year.  At it’s center, the historic and nationally listed Skansie Netshed preserves six generations of stories and traditions still shared by local fishing families.   

Mike Skansie's wife, Lydia, Mayor Chuck Hunter, Mike Skansie (son of Peter), Gretchen Wilbert, and Dianne Hunter during the 2010 100-year celebration at the Skansie Netshed.

Mike Skansie's wife, Lydia, Mayor Chuck Hunter, Mike Skansie (son of Peter), Gretchen Wilbert, and Dianne Hunter during the 2010 100-year celebration at the Skansie Netshed.

A Summer Sounds evening of music at Skansie Brother Park.

A Summer Sounds evening of music at Skansie Brother Park.

More information on the Skansie Family